Mt. Zion Historic Park

Type: 
parks
Oct 24
6:30pm to 7:30pm

In 1780, a Loudoun County soldier was tasked with one of the most audacious secret plots of the Revolutionary War--capturing the turncoat Benedict Arnold and bringing him to justice. Although John Champe was ultimately unable to complete this mission, his remarkable story and daring actions made him a national hero. Join NOVA Parks and the Mosby Heritage Area Association as we separate fact from fiction in the story of Loudoun's Revolutionary spy, John Champe.

The talk will take place at Historic Mt. Zion Church, located at 40309 John Mosby Highway, Aldie, Virginia. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students and can be purchased at the door. For more information call (540) 687-5578 or visit www.MosbyHeritageArea.org/Events

Aug 11
10:00am to 3:00pm

Our Civil War living history program will focus on the opening days of September 1862, just after the Confederate Army’s victory at the battle of Second Manassas.  Confederate General Robert E. Lee is moving his army north through Loudoun County, eventually meeting the Union Army near the small Maryland town of Sharpsburg, in the battle of Antietam.

The program will showcase some of the soldiers and officers of the Army of Northern Virginia as they would have appeared in 1862.  An army surgeon and a Confederate regimental officer will be among those on hand to discuss their roles during the war and in camp.  Visitors to this program will meet these men and learn about what it was like to serve in the army on the long marches of a military campaign during the American Civil War.

The program is presented by the Historical Interpretive Branch of the W. S. Hancock Society and by Civil War Historical Impressions. Admission is free, but donations are gratefully accepted. 

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Aug 10
9:00am to 5:00pm

Our Civil War living history program will focus on the opening days of September 1862, just after the Confederate Army’s victory at the battle of Second Manassas.  Confederate General Robert E. Lee is moving his army north through Loudoun County, eventually meeting the Union Army near the small Maryland town of Sharpsburg, in the battle of Antietam.

The program will showcase some of the soldiers and officers of the Army of Northern Virginia as they would have appeared in 1862.  An army surgeon and a Confederate regimental officer will be among those on hand to discuss their roles during the war and in camp.  Visitors to this program will meet these men and learn about what it was like to serve in the army on the long marches of a military campaign during the American Civil War.

The program is presented by the Historical Interpretive Branch of the W. S. Hancock Society and by Civil War Historical Impressions. Admission is free, but donations are gratefully accepted. 

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Oct 27
1:00pm to 5:00pm

Join us for guided tours of the 1851 Old School Baptist Church, site of an 1864 battle, and the adjacent cemetery. Tours include a living history presentation with Union army doctor describing how the church was used as a hospital during the war. Signatures of Civil War soldiers can be seen at this site, part of the Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail. This is a free program. No registration required.  Offered the fourth Sunday of the month, April through October.

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Oct 28
1:00pm to 5:00pm

Guided tours of the church and adjacent cemetery will be offered by a local historian.  Living history presentation with Union army doctor describing how the church was used as a hospital during the war. Signatures of Civil War soldiers can be seen at this site, part of the Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail.

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Sep 9
2:00pm to 4:00pm

Join fellow history enthusiasts for the next installment of Conversations in History, co-sponsored by NOVA Parks, the Mosby Heritage Area Association, and Loudoun County Public Libraries.  “Highway to War – Loudoun County and the Summer Campaigns of 1862” will focus on the Union and Confederate armies’ crossings through the county to and from Antietam.

In the summer of 1862, Confederate forces moved through Loudoun County on their way to the first Confederate invasion of Northern soil during the Civil War. Thousands of soldiers entered Loudoun, an event that many who witnessed it never forgot. The September 1862 river crossings outside of Leesburg led to America's bloodiest single day at the September 17 Battle of Antietam. Six weeks later, the United States Army trudged back into Virginia through Loudoun.

Authors Rob Orrison and Kevin Pawlak will look at the effects these campaigns had on Loudoun County and its citizens in 1862. Together, they will highlight the extant historic sites and landmarks that were relevant to the summer campaigns in 1862.  Their forthcoming book is To Hazard All: A Guide to the Maryland Campaign, 1862, published by Savas Beatie.

The program will be hosted by Rust Library, 380 Old Waterford Rd NW, Leesburg.  There is no admission fee and reservations are not necessary.  A guided tour of Harrison Hall, site of the meeting of Robert E. Lee with his generals prior to the Battle of Antietam, will be offered to attendees following the program. 

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Aug 11
9:00am to 5:00pm

Join us at this living history program and encampment that recreates troops from both the Union and Confederacy as they would have appeared in the days leading up to the Battle of Gettysburg.  Presented by the Historical Interpretive Branch of the Winfield Scott Hancock Society, this program will showcase some of the lesser known soldiers and officers as they would have appeared as they passed by Mt. Zion Church.  A Confederate surgeon and Union Quartermaster will be on hand to discuss their significant roles during the war.

In June of 1863 the Union Army had recently suffered a devastating loss at the Battle of Chancellorsville, at the hands of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia.  Lee began to move his army north, with the Union army in pursuit.  Major-general Winfield Scott Hancock, leading the 2nd Army Corps, passed through the Aldie area, encountering some of Lee’s soldiers on the way to what would become known as the battle of Gettysburg in July of 1863.

Last minute addition to our August 11th program!  Historian & author Eric Buckland will be speaking at 10am and 2pm on “Mosby’s Rangers: June 1863.”

Free admission. 

 

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Jul 22
1:00pm to 5:00pm

Guided tours of the church and adjacent cemetery will be offered by a local historian.  Living history presentation with Union army doctor describing how the church was used as a hospital during the war. Signatures of Civil War soldiers can be seen at this site, part of the Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail.

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Jun 24
1:00pm to 5:00pm

Guided tours of the 1851 church, site of an 1864 battle, and the adjacent cemetery.  Tours include a living history presentation with Union army doctor describing how the church was used as a hospital following the June 1863 cavalry battle at Aldie. Signatures of Civil War soldiers can be seen at this site, part of the Northern Virginia Civil War Graffiti Trail. 

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Jun 10
10:00am to 4:00pm

Visit Mt. Zion for the entire day, or drop in anytime to hear historians share fascinating stories of Confederate Col. John Mosby, his Rangers, and the community affected by their wartime activities.  Living history, books for sale, period music. $20 pp; children under 12 admitted free of charge; no advanced ticket sales.  Co-sponsored by Mosby Heritage Area Association, Stuart-Mosby Historical Society and NOVA Parks.

Image courtesy Mosby Heritage Area. 

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